As Kids Grow, So Do Parents

Do you ever feel that as a parent, time can be totally static and yet time can race so fast you wonder where it all went?

Getting ready for her moosical debut as a colorful cow.

Getting ready for her moosical debut as a colorful cow.

And so it was the other week, watching our now three-year-old daughter in her very first musical performance. Her preschool put on the show, “Barnyard Moosical”. Our Ladybug dressed as a cow and managed to sing along and do the “milkshake” shimmy on a stage with dozens of other kids, in front of dozens of parents.

My husband and I realized this was the first time we’d had the opportunity, and thus the experience, of being proud of her for remembering lines and dance cues and performing for a crowd. No longer a new baby, she’s growing into a person in her own rite – one who enjoys Japanese food at Yirasai on Maple Avenue, and one who makes her opinions and preferences known, sometimes nicely and sometimes via tantrums. Good grief, the tantrums.

When I step back and get philosophical about it all, it’s amazing that as parents, we each go into this endeavor of nurturing a child to become an adult – teaching that kid about the ways of the world, how to navigate thoughts and feelings, and to retain useful information. I think about how some species are born knowing how to walk, yet it takes ours a year to take a step. We are each reinventing the wheel, yet we each have to grow through it on our own terms.

Now I’m watching my six-week-old son grow, though this time I’m bolstered by the experiences from parenting my daughter. My guess is that he’s a bit calmer than my daughter – an “old soul”, as some have commented: “It’s like he’s always just been here”. Perspective is a valuable commodity. I can see how I’ve grown as a parent, yet the hardest thing for me still to do sometimes is to change quick enough or be flexible enough in my parenting approach to meet my children where they are at.

My midwife told me repeatedly that your first child shows you the depth of your love, your subsequent children show you the breadth of that love. I now can agree.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “As Kids Grow, So Do Parents

  1. I know just what you mean. As soon as I think I have my kids figured out, they change on me. I also have had to learn to let go of some of what I thought I had figured out with kid 1 when dealing with kid 2. They are really different people coming at the world from different places. They sure know how to keep me on my toes! (And I feel your pain on the 3 ye old tantrums. Oy!)

    Like

  2. Hey there So Very Vienna. Nice refresh to the blog pages (and I lol’d at the ‘More Blogs You Don’t Have Time To Read’ category – hadn’t noticed that before).

    And agree with this blog wholeheartedly. I have no idea why people talk of the ‘terrible twos’ when my own experience and everyone I’ve spoken to says how much worse the 3s are. Oh well – it’s worth it for the things they come out with. ‘What’s a wheelchair?’ she asked, after I’d explained why there were bars in the public bathroom. ‘What do you think?’ I reply. She paused. ‘A chair with wheels?’ she asks tentatively. ‘Spot on!’ I reply, ‘to help people whose legs don’t work.’ She ponders. ‘Like a scooter!’ she shouts excitedly. Exactly, dear, or close enough! Keep blogging…

    Like

    • Thanks, Annie’s Dad, for being an avid reader and supporter!

      I agree about preschoolers’ vocabulary and what information they now put together in those little, growing brains. Her questions and proclamations often catch me off guard, but usually because it is fun (and funny) to see what she comes up with!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s